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 Population Census

1 Migration of Population by Sex and Age

Nearly 30 percent of the population has changed addresses in the past five years.

- Of the population aged five and over (120,790,000 persons), except those who were not born as of five years prior to the closing date of the 2000 Census, 33.97 million were dwelling at places other than their present addresses as of five years ago (migrant population), and the ratio of these people to the population aged five and over (the ratio of migration) was 28.1 percent. This means that nearly 30 percent of the population has changed addresses in the past five years. In comparison with ten years previously in 1990, the migrant population increased by 4.47 million, a 2.9 percentage point rise in the migration rate.
A breakdown of the migration population by usual place of residence as of five years previously shows that 15.14 million persons moved within the same municipalities (12.5 percent of the population aged five and over), 8.39 million from other prefectures (6.9 percent), 7.86 million from other municipalities within the prefectures (6.5 percent), 1.97 million from other wards within the same city (1.6 percent), and 620,000 from overseas (0.5 percent).The migration ratio was highest for moves within the same municipalities. A comparison with 1990 shows that those who moved within the same municipality increased by 4.06 million (36.7 percent), while on the other hand those who moved from other prefectures declined by 500,000 (5.6 percent). (Table 1)

Table 1. Population 5 Years of Age and Over, by Sex and Place of Usual Residence Five Years Ago - Japan (1990, 2000)

In addition, a breakdown of the migrant population by sex shows that 17.31 million males and 16.67 million females moved, with migration ratios of 29.4 percent and 26.9 percent respectively, i.e. a higher percentage of males moved. In comparison with 1990, the migrant population increased by 2.2 million for males (14.6 percent) and 2.27 millions for females (15.7 percent) respectively. (Table 1)

High migration ratio for people in their 20s and 30s

- A breakdown of the migration ratio by age group shows that the highest ratio of 54.8 percent was for ages 30 to 34, followed by 54.7 percent for ages 25 to 29, and 44.4 percent for ages 20 to 24. A high ratio of those migrating were therefore in their 20s and 30s. For ages 40 to 60, the ratio declines with advancing age, and for ages 70 to 74, the ratio falls below 10 percent. For ages 75 and over, the ratio rises with advancing age, and for ages 85 and over, the ratio was 21.0 percent. Compared with 1990, the ratio has risen in all age groups except ages 25 to 29.
In addition, a breakdown by sex of the migration rate of the population aged 15 and over shows that females have a higher ratio in each of the age groups between 25 and 34 and 70 and over, with a higher ratio for males in the other age groups. (Table 2, Figures 1 and 2)

Figure 1. Ratio of Migration, by Age (Five-Year Groups) - Japan (1990, 2000)

 Figure 2. Ratio of Migration, by Age (Five-Year Groups) and Sex - Japan (2000)

High migration ratio for ages 20 to 24

- A breakdown of the migration ratio by age group and by usual place of residence five years previously shows that for ages 20 to 24, the ratio of migration within the same municipality (13.4 percent) is lower than that of migration from other prefectures (18.4 percent). For the other age groups, the rate of migration within the same municipality is higher than that of migration from other prefectures. Compared to 1990, the ratio of migration within the same municipality rose in all age groups, while that of migration from other prefectures declined in all age groups except ages 30 to 44 and 50 to 59. (Table 2)

Table 2. Ratio of Population 5 Years of Age and Over, based on Place of Usual Residence Five Years Ago, by Age (Five-Year Groups) and Sex - Japan (1990, 2000)

 2 Migration of Population by Prefecture

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